Six Views of Payson and Piskor

As I did in the past, I captured a time sequence of views of St. Lawrence University’s Payson and Piskor Halls (with the ultimate goal of making a dynamic desktop for macOS.) A steady tripod and a very large lens skirt made this possible.

I: Morning

Six Views of Payson and Piskor I: Day

II: Late Afternoon

Six Views of Payson and Piskor II: Late Afternoon

III: Sunset

Six Views of Payson and Piskor III: Sunset

IV: Blue Hour

Six Views of Payson and Piskor IV: Blue Hour

V: Night

Six Views of Payson and Piskor V: Night

VI: Dawn

Six Views of Payson and Piskor VI: Dawn

A Cold, Clear Night in Canton

This post represents a big moment for me: the first image from my new Sony α7R IV. This is only the third serious digital camera; my first was a Nikon D3100, and I’ve been shooting primarily with a D7000 for the past eight years. The capabilities from a decade of technological advancement and the engineering switch to a mirrorless design have pretty-well blown my mind. I really recommend clicking through to Flicker to look at this image at full scale—the tiny pinpricks of each star, the details in the windows of every building. The 61-MP capabilities of the α7R IV maybe be considered overkill by some, but I’m finding it to be the perfect tool for the kinds of “zoom in forever”-detailed photographs that I love to produce.

A Cold, Clear Night in Canton

Glass Bridges of Johnson Hall

I often show what I think of as the front of Johnson Hall of Science, but inspection of this image (particularly the top of the brick wing on the left) shows that the building’s name, and thus its front, are on this side. The dramatic glass structures extending between and out from the wings lend credence to the idea.

Glass Bridges of Johnson Hall