Indoor Ring with Hay

When the weather outside is frightful (pardon the cliché), an indoor ring is good for two very important duties: (1) keeping the hay dry to feed the horses and (2) riding. This photograph has symmetry highlighted by the very bright windows; when a very bright light source shines through a lens (and it’s particularly noticeable with this prime lens), it creates an image of itself on the inverse side of the center of the image. In this particular case, that inverted image appears over the pony, indicating that the pony is across the inversion point from the window.

Indoor Ring with Hay

The Bride at the Reception

This fall, I photographed my first wedding. When the wedding ceremony has finished, and the speeches had been made, the reception/party got into full swing. I’m particularly charmed by the way the flash lights up both the bride’s dress and the label of the Champagne in a room otherwise dominated by warm, earthy colors.

The Bride at the Reception

Madden Indoor

Here’s a little (huge panorama) teaser from an upcoming story I’ll have in Horse & Style Magazine, covering the barn and home of Olympic gold medal winner Beezie Madden. I was particularly enamored with this shot of the indoor ring, distorted to a fantastical shape by the panorama process. With all of this wood and wide beams, I can think of nothing more than a Viking longhouse (built at horse-scale, of course.)

Madden Indoor